Lawn fungus can cease to be a problem

Lawn fungus can cease to be a problem

See a smooth post-winter lawn transformation without lawn fungus

What makes starting your lawn care calendar more challenging? No, it’s not the changing season nor is it the drastic rise and fall of the temperature. These are the natural forces of nature you are not meant to go against. Lawn fungus, however, is a universally known nuisance in the world of lawn care. This is the time of the year when you should be watching out for lawn fungus. They can make starting the year right such a drag if left unchecked.

No matter, you can manage lawn fungus so they don’t ruin your up and coming healthy lawn in spring.

First, let us take a look at the factors surrounding the development and growth of lawn fungus at this time of the year. After all, you need to identify them to be able to properly deal with them and effectively prevent them. So what are these lawn diseases and what invites them to your lawn? There are a whole bunch of lawn fungus types.

As winter departs, one common lawn fungus that might prey on your lawn is the snow mold. The snow mold usually appears in early spring just after the winter frost decides to leave. Snow molds occur when snow falls on grass that are not frozen. The snow tends to linger on the grass quite long. This causes the blades of grass to be compacted.

Early signs of snow mold is the appearance of straw-colored patches on your lawn.

Snow mold is the kind of lawn fungus that is likely to go away as the snow melts and the cold weather gives way to the spring rain. However, as it does, it also leaves patches of your lawn to die.

In the coming spring to summer season, the brown patch is, by far, one of the most common of these lawn diseases that can bring peril to your lawn. They can very easily damage your turf before it can even arise for spring. The brown patch affects all types of grass. The damage from this lawn fungus type manifests as brown patches, as its name suggests. They appear as brown spots on individual blades of grass and rotted sheaths on the soil, too. If left untreated, this becomes widespread on the lawn and won’t just appear as circular spots. They spread everywhere. You are likely to see completely bare spots where the fungus chooses to settle and do its damage.

Large patches thrive best in warm and humid environments, making warm season grasses susceptible to its harm.

The brown patch attacks the roots of the grass. The early symptoms are yellow circular patches on your lawn. A circular new growth may appear at the center of the circle. You will notice your grass blades eventually turn brown and if you look closely, you will see small circular brown spots on the blades. You will also see that you can easily pull out your grass from the ground as the fungus causes the plant stems to rot. In effect, the stems may be slimy or dark at the base because of the rot from the patch.

With these two and all the rest of the lawn fungus that can potentially take over your lawn early in the start of the year, you will do well to know how to prevent them and cure any signs that may make room for them. The best way to identify lawn fungus in your lawn is by its symptoms. You already know that snow molds appear as straw- colored patches, while brown patches appear as yellow circular patches on your lawn at their earliest state. What you can do is make sure the fungus does not spread all over your lawn.

The most common way it can spread is through your very own footsteps and lawn maintenance habits.

Your footsteps and lawnmowers can easily be vehicles in which the lawn fungus can spread across your yard. So you see, it is not such a bad idea to avoid stepping on your lawn even in winter. When you mow, be sure to remove all grass clippings afterwards.

Choosing the right fungicide is also a must. It an be tough, so if you don’t have a selected brand in your shelf, it is best to approach a lawn care expert to weigh the pros and cons for you. After all, you need to have the right fungicide or treatment that addresses the specific lawn fungus problems you have in your yard.

FAQ: Can lawn fungus go away on its own?

Understandably so, as every home owner sets his heart on, the goal is to clear away the remnants of the frost of spring to make way for a green spring. Lawn fungus and pests become number one enemies that deter you from this goal. So we can’t blame you if the only sentiment you have for lawn fungus and pests is frustration. Now you wonder, with all the means and ways to get them off your lawn, can they possibly just go away without your intervention? Well, there is no cookie cutter way to answer this question.

The growth and survival of lawn fungus is highly dependent on the type of grass you have on your lawn.

Additionally, the external factors in the surrounding environment play a part, too. The key is to pick up some nuggets in this piece to identify which lawn fungus, pest, or disease your lawn has. That way, you know how to target it with the best fit solution. The surest answer to this question is NO. Lawn fungus won’t go away on its own. Treatment may vary based on what you identify that’s growing on your lawn. Then you can pick a fungicide to inhibit and cease its growth. Practicing good turf management gives you an edge against lawn fungus and pests. Contact your lawn care expert for recommendations.

What All American Turf Beauty Says About Post Winter Lawn Care Maintenance

Dealing with lawn fungus is no walk in the park. Aside from them being silent opponents, they are also difficult to identify. With the cool season drawing to a close, your lawn becomse susceptible to these lawn diseases. Early detection gives you a whole lot of advantage. Don’t hesitate to reach out to your lawn care experts in Iowa for seasoned advice and insight on protecting your lawn from lawn fungus and pests. You can count on expert advice from lawn experts at All American Turf Beauty to keep you on track. Call us today and talk to our lawn care experts at 1-800-365-8873 or you may visit us at 311 Desoto Rd, Van Meter, IA.